Prairie States Mushroom Club


Check out our photo pages at:

http://iowamushroom.smugmug.com/

There are HUNDREDS of top quality fungi photos here organized into several galleries. Enjoy!


A beautiful Bird's Nest fungi in a nut shell. Photo by Glen Schwartz


Morchella esculenta. A nice cluster of morels. Photo by Glen Schwartz.


Volvariella bombycina. Photo by Glen Schwartz.


A small Mycena. Photo by Glen Schwartz.


Trichaptum biforme. Purple Tooth. Photo by Glen Schwartz.


Xerula sp. Photo by Glen Schwartz. Not sure about the specie of this one. It has the cap like X. furfuracea and the stem like X. megalospora.


Pholiota albocrenulata Photo by Bob Scarth.


Morchella esculenta "Yellow Morel" Photo by Jason Clarke.


Urnula craterium "Devil's Urn" Photo by Jason Clarke. Note the water in the bottom of several of the cups. Nice photo Jason!


Sarcoscypha austriaca. Early spring Scarlet Cup. Photo by Glen Schwartz.


Calvatia gigantea, also known as giant puffball. Photo by Peter Hansen.


Phaeocalicium polyporaeum "Fairy Pins on Purple Tooth" Photo by Glen Schwartz.


Some Phaeocalicium polyporaeum (Fairy pins) on Trichaptum biforme. Photo by Glen Schwartz.


A cluster of Armillaria mellea (honey) mushrooms. Photo by Glen Schwartz.


A young Laetiporus sulphureus on a honeylocust tree. Photo by Peter Hansen.


Arcyria denudata Photo by William Brugman.


Arcyria cinerea Photo by William Brugman.


Pluteus salicinus Photo by Linda & Bob Scarth. The blue stain near the base of the stem separates this from P. cervinus


Microstoma floccosa "Fairy goblet" Photo by Linda & Bob Scarth.


Microstoma floccosa "Fairy goblet" Another stick with fairy goblets. This picture taken at Wickiup Hills by Glen Schwartz


Scutellinia scutellata "Eyelash cups" Photo by Linda & Bob Scarth.


Mutinus elegans "Stinkhorn" Photo by Linda & Bob Scarth.


Mutinus elegans "Stinkhorn" Photo by James Scheib


A young polypore. Photo by William Brugman.


Mycena leaiana "Lady Lion" Photo by Glen Schwartz. I took the photo and looked at it at least 10 times before I noticed the Hypoxylon(?) (grey/black lumpy mass) near the base of the Mycena.


Enlarged section of the previous photo. Note the color of the edge of the gills.


Mycena leaiana "Lady Lion" Photo by Glen Schwartz. Another lady lion from Pinicon Ridge Park.


Enlarged section of the previous photo.


Polyporus squamosus "Dryad's Saddle" Photo by Rosanne Healy.


Closup of the "dew drops" on the squamosus.


Amanita muscaria var. guessowii "Fly Agaric" These photos represent the first confirmed sighting of this mushroom in Iowa since the 1920s. Photo by Roger Heidt


Amanita muscaria var. guessowii "Fly Agaric" Photo by Roger Heidt


Craterellus fallax "Horn of Plenty", "Black Chanterelle" Photo by Roger Heidt


Cordyceps variabilis. Photo by Roger Heidt. This fungus is parasitic on fly larva.


Exidia recisa "Black Jelly" Photo by Roger Heidt


Laetiporus cincinnatus. Red/white variation of the Sulphur Shelf, Photo by Roger Heidt.


Another Laetiporus cincinnatus. Photo by Roger Heidt. This is a choice edible, not to be confused with....


Meripilus giganteus. Photo by Roger Heidt. This also edible, but not very good.


Urnula craterium "Devil's Urn" Photo by Roger Heidt


Myxomycota Metatrichia vesparium (?) on grass. Photo by Glen Schwartz


Lentinus strigosus AKA Panus rudis Photo by Glen Schwartz


Morchella esculenta "Yellow Morel" Photo by Roger Heidt


Pleurotus ostreatus "Oyster Mushroom" Photo by Roger Heidt


Trametes versicolor "Turkey Tail" and friends. Photo by Roger Heidt


Lycoperdon pulcherrimum "Spiny Puffball" Photo by Roger Heidt


Strobilomyces strobilaceus "Old Man of the Woods" Photo by Glen Schwartz. This distinctive mushroom is edible, but not very good.


Chlorosplenium versiforme Photo by Glen Schwartz. Interesting yellow/green cups found at the Amana trail.


Flammulina velutipes "Velvet Foot", "Velvet Stalk" Photo by Roger Heidt


Amanita sp. Photo by Glen Schwartz. Note the "patches" on the cap. They are remnants of the veil.


PSMC past president Dave Layton holding a prime example of Agaricus augustus. These mushrooms may have come to Iowa through some West Coast mulch.